Infinity

By: swaps

Nov 27 2008

Tags: , , , ,

Category: Architecture, city, culture, Philosophy

13 Comments

Aperture:f/2.8
Focal Length:6mm
ISO:800
Shutter:1/8 sec
Camera:Canon PowerShot SX100 IS

Om poornam-adah, poornam-idam,
poor-nath Poornam-udachyate;
Poor-nasya poornam-adaya,
Poornam-eva-vashishyate.

That is full, this also is full,

This fullness came from that Fullness

Though this fullness came from that Fullness

That Fullness remains forever full.

(Some opine that this shloka is the earliest exposition of the Steady State model of the Universe.)

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13 comments on “Infinity”

  1. Ohhh Wow…..Loved the sloka, which one is it from?
    And the temple , which one in Mysore?

  2. Sahaja,
    Shloka is form Upanishad (Which one? I know not).
    It is Chamundeshwari temple atop Chamundi hills in Mysore (remember your beloved Mahishasura’s statue?).

  3. very FULLfilling foto 😛

  4. lovely shot..
    🙂

    _______________________________________________

    Welcome Your Highness 🙂

  5. nice one 🙂 both the picture and slogan

  6. Thanks to all 🙂

  7. exellent shot and post!

  8. Axinia, I knew you will like it 🙂

  9. ohh wow…..ya ya i remember [:)]

  10. Nice shot! Where are the friendly simians that ask you for some bananas? 🙂

  11. Oh, I had missed this one…. nice angle! 🙂

  12. It is interesting that you choose this hymn. What is interesting is that not only does this hymn describe steady state, but also is the first definition of infinity. Poorna means complete or that which encompasses everything. And the only thing that does encompass everything is infinity. There is also some mathematics described in this Hymn. It says when the whole (infinity) is subtracted or added to infinity, infinity still remains. Another wonderful thing about the symbol of infinity is that it is a complete or closed symbol (the other two being 0 and 8). It is suggestive of the fact that infinity is whole or complete in itself. 0 represents “Shunya” or void. And 8 has significance in Chinese, Japanese and Indian tradition to represent the totality of the universe, multiplicity and Ashtanga yoga (the 8 facets of yoga) respectively. Fabulous isn’t it?


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